malformalady:

A man stands near a lava flow on Holuhraun, part of the larger Bardarbunga volcano system, northwest of the Dyngjujoekull glacier in Iceland, on September 1, 2014.
Photo credit: Eggert Johannesson/AP Photo

malformalady:

A man stands near a lava flow on Holuhraun, part of the larger Bardarbunga volcano system, northwest of the Dyngjujoekull glacier in Iceland, on September 1, 2014.

Photo credit: Eggert Johannesson/AP Photo

(vía callmehelvetica)

wnderlst:

Transylvania, Romania | Radu Dumitrescu-Elian

wnderlst:

Transylvania, Romania | Radu Dumitrescu-Elian

(vía enjoytheflames7)

fogo-av:

mentalalchemy:

nezua:

fnhfal:

Ferguson -2014

I blinked one day and when I opened my eyes, it was normal to have an American army battling Americans on American streets. No one even calls it a war. But it is.

Don’t forget this crazy shit actually happened.

Don’t forget this shit is STILL happening

(vía futurerovine)

me han regalado esta maravilla <3

me han regalado esta maravilla <3

me gusta hablar sobre mis personas favoritas »

Do not call me perfect,

a lie is never a compliment.

Call me an erratic

damaged and

insecure mess.

Then tell me that you

love me for it.

- Beau Taplin || You’re a fucking wreck and I love you for it. (via afadthatlastsforever)

(vía gemdol)


thingsorganizedneatly:

Soldiers’ Inventories by Thom Atkinson, for the Telegraph Magazine

editor: Great series of British soldiers’ equipment from different wars and battles through British history & up to the present. See the original story on the Telegraph website, an interview on Creative Review, & full series of images on ThomAtkinson.com

(Fuente: thomatkinson, vía adictoalcafe)

historicaltimes:

Anti-fascist militia women defending a street barricade, Barcelona, 1936 by Robert Capa.

historicaltimes:

Anti-fascist militia women defending a street barricade, Barcelona, 1936 by Robert Capa.

(vía berenjena-rebozada)

(Fuente: omnics, vía alnorteyalamierda)

little-miss-melancholy:

Halcyone by Herbert James Draper
1915

(vía notwiselybuttoowell)

You won’t allow me to go to school.
I won’t become a doctor.
Remember this:
One day you will be sick.
-

Poem written by an 11 year old Afghan girl 

This poem was recorded in a NYT magazine article about female underground poetry groups in Afghanistan. An amazing article about the ways in which women are using a traditional two line poetry form to express their resistance to male oppression, their feelings about love (considered blasphemous).

Here’s the link

(via ranjhana)

(Fuente: chidealist, vía maruxia)


dynamicafrica:

Tunisian Island Becomes Street Art Hub, Raises Questions of Politics in Graffiti.

Whether cave paintings or hieroglyphics, Africans have been painting on walls for centuries. However, the idea of turning open streets into an open outdoor gallery and exhibit is something relatively new to North Africa’s largest island and Tunisia’s most popular tourist destination Djerba.

The initiative, curated by Tunisian-French artist Mehdi Ben Cheikh in collaboration with Paris-based art gallery Galerie Itinerance, is called Djerbahood features works from around 150 artists spanning 30 different countries, including Sweden’s ROA, Alexis Diaz from Puerto Rico, Stinkfish out of Colombia, Brazilian muralist Claudio Ethos, French artist Brusk, Moroccan calligraphist Abdellatif Moustad, and Tunisian street artists eL Seed and The Inkman.

Dealing with issues ranging from history and politics, to spirituality and tradition, Djerbahood, is a collaboration of epic proportions. Whether intentional or not (and I think not), the name calls to mind the racism that exists in the world of street art and graffiti culture that has, in recent years, both omitted and excluded the contributions made by black and brown artists in the popularization of this art form. Were in not for movies like Wild Style and Style Wars, the origins of resistance graffiti might all be forgotten from popular memory.

However, with the growing number of street artists and street art emerging from this area of the world in recent times, it would’ve been more interesting had they featured a selection of artists from around the African continent. Countries like South Africa and Senegal are home to some of the continent’s growing local street art scenes. Due to its size, it somewhat eclipses the grassroots graffiti movements across North Africa made headlines when #ArabSpring was a trending topic, and seemed to fade as quickly as it was noticed by the west. Then again, the politics behind this open art affair, due to unveil September 20th, aren’t rooted in Pan-African sentimentality, being sponsored by parties from France and Tunisia.

This project forms part of a growing trend of foreign street artists descending on Africa, from the likes of French artist JR’s “Women Are Heroes" series that stopped in Sierra Leone, Kenya, Sudan and Liberia, to ROA’s "Wide Open Walls" in The Gambia.

Similarly to the reactions from people in the aforementioned countries, locals in the area have had mixed responses to the art works, from some labeling it as vandalism to others welcoming the diversity and finding inspiration in the larger-than-life paintings.

See an extended gallery.

(image sources: Aline Deschamps/Galerie Itinerrance | Mohamed Messara | EPA Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)

(vía maruxia)

knifepics:

Straight Razor - Japanese Origin

ay &lt;3

knifepics:

Straight Razor - Japanese Origin

ay <3

the-cultist:

Engravings and illustrations from A New and Complete Illustration of the Celestial Science of Astrology, 13th ed.

A posthumous republication of the original work by astrologist and physician Ebenezer Sibly, detailing the procedure of magic and divination through astrology, and an account of the spirit world.

(Fuente: scarlet-library, vía pussymiaou)

(Fuente: spraytrains, vía unacuentaparalela)